Food & Drinks

Drinking Two to Three Cups of Coffee Daily Linked to Longer Lifespan, Study Finds

For those who own a “Don’t Talk to Me Before I’ve Had My Coffee” mug, emerging research from the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) might hold good news. The study, published Tuesday, links coffee consumption to a longer life and lowered risk for cardiovascular disease.

The research was included in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, according to a Sept. 27 press release from the ESC. The survey-based research suggests that those who drink several cups of joe each day will live longer and are less likely to develop cardiovascular disease compared to those who don’t consume java at all.

The participant pool included 449,563 individuals ranging in age from 40-69, with no history of arrhythmias or cardiovascular disease. After completing a short questionnaire, they were divided into six groups based on their daily caffeine habits. Over 100,000 people who avoid coffee altogether were included for comparison.

Researchers studied the medical records and death records of participants across consumption categories. While some 27,800 participants passed away during the lengthy study, coffee drinkers recorded a lower likelihood of death across all causes.

One unexpected learning from the study? Decaffeinated coffee offers similar heart-healthy and longevity benefits. It’s believed that coffee’s non-caffeinated components carry its greatest health benefits.

“In this large, observational study, ground, instant, and decaffeinated coffee were associated with equivalent reductions in the incidence of cardiovascular disease and death from cardiovascular disease or any cause,” the study’s author Peter Kistler states in the press release. “The results suggest that mild to moderate intake of ground, instant, and decaffeinated coffee should be considered part of a healthy lifestyle.”

Don’t get carried away, though: These health benefits predominantly applied to participants who consumed two-three cups each day. Drinking your weight in cold brew could raise other unrelated health risks.

“Our findings indicate that drinking modest amounts of coffee of all types should not be discouraged but can be enjoyed as a heart healthy behavior,” says Kistler.

We’ll raise a mug to that!

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