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‘Lost Golden City’ Discovered In Egypt, Complete With A Mysterious Skeleton

Archaeologists in Egypt have discovered a 3,400-year-old lost city near Luxor, believed to be the largest ancient settlement ever uncovered in the nation.  

“Many foreign missions searched for this city and never found it,” Zahi Hawass, who led the team that made the discovery, announced on Facebook in a statement that said the city was “untouched” and “left by the ancient residents as if it were yesterday.” 

They also found a seal calling the city “The domain of the dazzling Aten,” but Hawass has given it the nickname of “the Lost Golden City.”  



Lost City

Hawass said his team had been looked for the mortuary temple of Tutankhamun.

Instead, they found the city, which was active during the reign of Tut’s grandfather, Amenhotep III, who ruled from 1391–1353 BC. 

“The discovery of this lost city is the second most important archeological discovery since the tomb of Tutankhamun,” Betsy Bryan, Egyptology professor at John Hopkins University, said in a news release, adding that the discoveries there will “give us a rare glimpse into the life of the Ancient Egyptians at the time where the Empire was at his wealthiest.” 

LUXOR, EGYPT - APRIL 10: Workers at the site of a 3000 year-old lost city on April 10, 2021 in Luxor, Egypt. Egyptian archaeo



LUXOR, EGYPT – APRIL 10: Workers at the site of a 3000 year-old lost city on April 10, 2021 in Luxor, Egypt. Egyptian archaeologists have discovered Aten or “the lost golden city” which is believed to be the largest ancient city ever discovered in Egypt and one of the most important finds since the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb. The 3000 year-old city which dates back to the reign of Amenhotep III was discovered near Luxor. After seven months of excavations the team unearthed several neighborhoods which included, a bakery and administrative and residential districts. Jewelry, pottery vessels, scarab beetle amulets, and rooms filled with tools of daily life were also found giving archaeologists a rare glimpse into ancient Egyptian life.(Photo by Mahmoud Khaled/Getty Images)

They found a bakery, including the ovens, as well as a workshop and tools used for industrial activity such as spinning and weaving during the seven months of excavation so far.

“Everybody loves the thought of an exciting, untouched tomb, but actually this is probably more significant and more important than if it was a pharaoh’s tomb,” British archaeologist Hannah Pethen, who wasn’t involved in the dig, told NBC News. “We have a lot of tombs and we know a lot about them, but we don’t have a lot of evidence about how Egyptians lived and worked in their cities.”

10 April 2021, Egypt, Luxor: Ancient Egyptian artefacts are seen at the site of the newly discovered 3,000-year-old "lost cit



10 April 2021, Egypt, Luxor: Ancient Egyptian artefacts are seen at the site of the newly discovered 3,000-year-old “lost city” in present-day Luxor. An expedition of Egyptian archaeologists has unearthed what has been described as one of the most important finds in Egypt since Tutankhamen’s tomb in 1922. The ancient city dates back to the era of Ancient Egyptian King Amenhotep III, who ruled Egypt from 1391 BC to 1353 BC, said prominent Egyptian archaeologist Zahi Hawass, who led the expedition. Photo: Fadel Dawood/dpa (Photo by Fadel Dawood/picture alliance via Getty Images)

Archaeologists also uncovered a residential and administrative area, which is fenced in by zigzag walls ― which were unusual in ancient Egypt ― as well as a singly entry point, which may have been for security.

Hawass added that he hoped the discovery would help lead to a resurgence in tourism to Egypt. 

A picture taken on April 10, 2021, shows workers at the archaeological site of a 3000 year old city, dubbed The Rise of Aten,



A picture taken on April 10, 2021, shows workers at the archaeological site of a 3000 year old city, dubbed The Rise of Aten, dating to the reign of Amenhotep III, uncovered by the Egyptian mission near Luxor. – Archaeologists have uncovered the remains of an ancient city in the desert outside Luxor that they say is the “largest” ever found in Egypt and dates back to a golden age of the pharaohs 3,000 years ago. Famed Egyptologist Zahi Hawass announced the discovery of the “lost golden city”, saying the site was uncovered near Luxor, home of the legendary Valley of the Kings. (Photo by Khaled DESOUKI / AFP) (Photo by KHALED DESOUKI/AFP via Getty Images)


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