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Duchess of Sussex wins court battle with UK newspaper

The Duchess of Sussex has won the latest stage in her legal fight against British newspaper Mail on Sunday.

The publisher of the tabloid appealed a decision that it was unlawful to release a letter she wrote to her estranged father.

But a London court has upheld the ruling, saying Meghan had a reasonable expectation of privacy.

A three-judge panel concluded the letter's contents were "personal, private and not matters of legitimate public interest".

The publisher disputes the Duchess' claim that she didn't intend for the letter to be seen, saying correspondence with her communications secretary shows she suspected it might be leaked.

The Duchess has released a statement saying: "This is a victory not just for me, but for anyone who has ever felt scared to stand up for what's right."

The Duchess of Sussex has won the latest stage in her legal fight against British newspaper Mail on Sunday.

The publisher of the tabloid appealed a decision that it was unlawful to release a letter she wrote to her estranged father.

But a London court has upheld the ruling, saying Meghan had a reasonable expectation of privacy.

A three-judge panel concluded the letter’s contents were “personal, private and not matters of legitimate public interest”.

The publisher disputes the Duchess’ claim that she didn’t intend for the letter to be seen, saying correspondence with her communications secretary shows she suspected it might be leaked.

The Duchess has released a statement saying: “This is a victory not just for me, but for anyone who has ever felt scared to stand up for what’s right.”
The Duchess of Sussex has won the latest stage in her legal fight against British newspaper Mail on Sunday.

The publisher of the tabloid appealed a decision that it was unlawful to release a letter she wrote to her estranged father.

But a London court has upheld the ruling, saying Meghan had a reasonable expectation of privacy.

A three-judge panel concluded the letter’s contents were “personal, private and not matters of legitimate public interest”.

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The publisher disputes the Duchess’ claim that she didn’t intend for the letter to be seen, saying correspondence with her communications secretary shows she suspected it might be leaked.

The Duchess has released a statement saying: “This is a victory not just for me, but for anyone who has ever felt scared to stand up for what’s right.”

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